First Foods Program Colorado Project Completed Thanks to the Chinook Fund

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
PRESS CONTACT: Desiree Kane
Grinding Stone Collective
October 28, 2021
team@grindingstone.org

Oct 28, 2021

COLORADO-BASED INDIGENOUS CULTURE BEARERS RECEIVE IMPORTANT PLATFORM INVESTMENTS THROUGH PARTNERSHIP ALONGSIDE FIRST FOODS PROGRAM AND CHINOOK FUND

After receiving a start-up grant from the Chinook Fund of Denver, Colorado, First Foods Program completed two months of programming featuring Indigenous culture-bearers from Colorado. This award supported the efforts of the First Foods Program in uplifting the work and knowledge of tribes and communities across the state.

Throughout the months of September and October, First Foods Program was hosted by Indigenous culture-bearers including Regina Lopez-Whiteskunk (Ute Mountain Ute Tribe of Towac), Thomas Allen (Sac and Fox Nation of Oklahoma, Northern Arapaho Tribe of Wyoming, and Yuchi Tribe of Oklahoma), Sarah Ortegon (Eastern Shoshone & Northern Araphao), Shaina Oliver (Northern Dine), Leo Cordier (Sicangu Lakota), and GreenLatinos’ Ean Tafoya.

Topics included the history of the Ute Council Tree, Arapaho matriarchy, a demonstration of collecting and processing chokecherries, and Sumac pinones and water quality. Whether providing invaluable history or practical botanical knowledge, First Foods Program’s work with Indigenous People in the occupied Indigenous territories called Colorado reached over 21,000 throughout the month of October alone. Free and never monetized, the content produced not only informs and engages audiences in thoughtful conversation and informative content, but is accessible for anyone who seeks to learn such knowledge in the future. Thanks to the support of Chinook Fund, Grinding Stone Collective continues to create spaces for Natives to showcase their knowledge and skills while simultaneously growing in community.

Our flagship endeavor, First Foods Program, promotes food sovereignty for Indigenous Peoples through education, community, and mutual aid. Food sovereignty localizes food systems, connects food producers and recipients, and gives agency back to peoples historically deprived of autonomy. Through educational videos and materials, free, and made accessible online, we provide culture bearers a platform on which to teach practices and preparation of Indigenous foods to those who do not have previous access. We provide teaching opportunities to a population of people who are invaluable in preserving biodiversity, promoting alternative food preparation, and highlighting ways to build health outside of industrial food systems.

Please visit grindingstone.org for more information.

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